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The developing story of a linguistically sensitive pathway in teacher education

The recent curriculum for Finnish basic education highlights linguistically sensitive teaching (LST) as a critical part of education, yet to-date LST has only been part of teacher education for selected groups. As part of Listiac at the University of Jyväskylä, we have worked to integrate and extend LST across the class teacher education curriculum to create a pathway from the 1st year of studies to the final teaching practice.

Collaborative understanding of LST for ITE: Notes from the fieldwork

LISTIAC BLOG RELAY RACE #5: AUTONOMOUS UNIVERSITY OF BARCELONA Read more about the Blog Relay Race Catalonia has a long tradition of managing school plurilingualism –in the two co-official languages (Catalan and Spanish) and curricular foreign languages (English, mostly)–, but the arrival of many students from different countries over the past two decades has demanded …

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Towards the Tower of Power

In 2018 some channels of informal communication from the Lithuanian Ministry of Education, Science and Sports suggested that plurilingualism will never be a priority in Lithuanian general education. Thus, it came as no surprise to the Lithuanian Listiac team to see how little linguistically sensitive teaching has been known, considered or discussed by any of the parties in education, from teachers to policy makers, let alone attempted to be implemented in practice. In contrast, the reality of the past few years has proved the growing need of LST in facing the emerging changes in linguistic diversity in the Lithuanian schools.

Towards linguistically sensitive teacher education: one student reflection at a time

Listiac Blog Relay Race #1: Åbo Akademi University Read more about the Blog Relay Race Åbo Akademi University takes pride in its values diversity, openness, courage, participation and sustainability. The university’s profile focusing on minority research has its core in the Swedish-speaking minority on the national level, but it also builds on a broad understanding …

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Common misconception #4: Some languages are better than others

Languages are much more than communication tools, they are strong markers of social identity. Linguistically sensitive teachers understand the complexity of the relationship between language, culture and identity and also know how to challenge the way learners perceive certain languages. Schools tend to privilege dominant languages Two types of values are associated with languages: the …

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