Common misconception #3: Using two or more languages in class is confusing for learners

The concept of using more languages in class reflects the experience of multilingual children, who use the practice of alternating between two or more languages in a very sophisticated way. This act is called translanguaging and it is an important part of learners’ plurilingual competence. Yet, some fear that this practice could cause confusion and …

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Common misconception #2: Once learners can speak the language of schooling, they no longer require additional language support

Linguistically sensitive teachers know that “non-native” plurilingual learners may acquire competences in spoken school language more easily than they do in written school language, especially when it comes to academic contexts. Linguistically sensitive teachers support both oral and written academic language competences. Cognitive academic language proficiency Plurilingual learners need to be able to use the …

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Doing Policy Experimentation During a Global Crisis

After ten months of planning, piloting and training, the Listiac fieldwork officially started in January 2020. Little did we know then that the data collection was about to become much more complicated than expected. Although the schools have been closed in all of the partnership countries and parts of the partnership have been in lockdown …

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Meet the Portuguese Listiac partner

Algarve, the southernmost region of continental Portugal, has a population which derives from the successive population mobilities that have taken place throughout history. Nowadays, the linguistic landscape is a mix of languages, cultures, and identities.  Since the end of the 1960s, especially since the emergence of tourism, people from all over northern Europe, initially, have …

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Common misconception #1: Good teaching for native speakers is good teaching for non-native learners

Good teaching – one that provides learners with ultimate learning experience – is naturally appreciated by all students. Nevertheless, non-native learners may have very different linguistic and cultural characteristics and needs, which “plain” good teaching fails to accommodate. This is why we need linguistically sensitive teachers. Not all learners learn the language of schooling in …

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Answer our survey!

Are you a teacher educator, an in-service teacher or a student teacher in Europe? We would like to hear your thoughts on linguistically sensitive teaching! The Listiac online survey, targetting teacher educators, in-service teachers and teachers-to-be, is now live. The survey (available in eleven languages) is one of six research instruments used in the project. …

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